H. Kessler

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  1. 3 votes
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    5 comments  ·  Support Forum  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    Update:

    What about adding long-press of the ‘X’ causes the suggestion to be suppressed this time but not in the future? This is the opposite of the way Jon Lang suggests but users will be unlikely to discover long-press and their first priority is to “teach” the keyboard not to make substitutions that are not right for them. Aside from that, we don’t want to get into adding manual actions for controlling the dictionary because the goal is this kind of fiddling is kept out of the user’s hands. (Note, ‘ie’ → ‘i.e.’ and similar have been added as hard-coded shortcuts in English.

    (Earlier comment):

    The problem you mention is an annoying one. But I’m not sure about solving it by taking up a slot on the suggestions row for (typed) or “typed” every time there is an auto-suggestion. The constant presence of that item is one of the things…

    H. Kessler supported this idea  · 
  2. 6 votes
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    3 comments  ·  Support Forum  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    We are probably going to do this but have been trying to fully get the newly-introduced phone layouts fully settled and debugged first. Sorry about the delay.

    For reference, we currently understand the main differences of Swiss German from German keyboard to be:

    - Put French é,à,è in place of Ö,Ä,Ü
    - Remove ß (or possibly put a special ‘ss’ key in place of it
    - Add ç
    - Largely different shifted number row

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    H. Kessler commented  · 

    In Switzerland you often write text including both german and french words. The difference between Swiss-German layout and Swiss-French layout is only at three keys: the Swiss-German variety has the German umlauts (ä, ö, ü) accessible without dead keys, while the Swiss-French version has the French accented characters (é, à, è) accessible in the unshifted state.

    There is a big difference to the layout of Germany/Austria concerning all the shift characters. For example:
    shift 3 = § at Germany, = * at Switzerland
    shift 4 = $ at Germany, = ç at Switzerland

    The exact layout of swiss keyboards is explained at:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QWERTZ#Switzerland_(German,_French,_Italian,_Romansh),_Liechtenstein,_Luxembourg

    H. Kessler supported this idea  · 

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